The Ghosts Of Robespierre

MAN'S ENDLESS MARCH TO REALIZATION

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thepeoplesrecord:

John Carlos & Tommie Smith give Black Power salute at 1968 Mexico City Olympics medal ceremony
When the medals were awarded for the men’s 200-meter sprint at the 1968 Olympic Games, Life magazine photographer John Dominis was only about 20 feet away from the podium. “I didn’t think it was a big news event,” Dominis says. “I was expecting a normal ceremony. I hardly noticed what was happening when I was shooting.”
Indeed, the ceremony that October 16 “actually passed without much general notice in the packed Olympic Stadium,” New York Times correspondent Joseph M. Sheehan reported from Mexico City. But by the time Sheehan’s observation appeared in print three days later, the event had become front-page news: for politicizing the Games, U.S. Olympic officials, under pressure from the International Olympic Committee, had suspended medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos and sent them packing.
Smith and Carlos, winners of the gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the event, had come to the ceremony dressed to protest: wearing black socks and no shoes to symbolize African-American poverty, a black glove to express African-American strength and unity. (Smith also wore a scarf, and Carlos beads, in memory of lynching victims.) As the national anthem played and an international TV audience watched, each man bowed his head and raised a fist. After the two were banished, images of their gesture entered the iconography of athletic protest.
"It was a polarizing moment because it was seen as an example of black power radicalism," says Doug Hartmann, a University of Minnesota sociologist and the author of Race, Culture, and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic Protests and Their Aftermath. “Mainstream America hated what they did.”
The United States was already deeply divided over the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement, and the serial traumas of 1968—mounting antiwar protests, the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, the beating of protesters during the Democratic National Convention by Chicago police—put those rifts into high relief. Before the Olympics, many African-American athletes had talked of joining a boycott of the Games to protest racial inequities in the United States. But the boycott, organized by sociologist Harry Edwards, never came off.
As students at San Jose State University, where Edwards was teaching, Smith and Carlos took part in that conversation. Carlos, born and raised in Harlem, was “an extreme extrovert with a challenging personality,” says Edwards, now emeritus professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. Smith, the son of sharecroppers who grew up in rural Texas and California, was “a much softer, private person.” When they raised their fists on the medals stand, they were acting on their own.
Among the Games athletes, opinions were divided. Australia’s Peter Norman, the winner of the silver medal in the 200-meter sprint, mounted the podium wearing a badge supporting Edwards’ organization. Heavyweight boxer George Foreman—who would win a gold medal and wave an American flag in the ring—dismissed the protest, saying, “That’s for college kids.” The four women runners on the U.S. 400-meter relay team dedicated their victory to the exiled sprinters. A representative of the USSR was quoted as saying, perhaps inevitably, “The Soviet Union never has used the Olympic Games for propaganda purposes.”
Smith and Carlos returned home to a wave of opprobrium—they were “black-skinned storm troopers,” in the words of Brent Musburger, who would gain fame as a TV sportscaster but was then a columnist for the Chicago American newspaper—and anonymous death threats. The pressure, Carlos says, was a factor in his then-wife’s suicide in 1977. “One minute everything was sunny and happy, the next minute was chaos and crazy,” he says. Smith recalls, “I had no job and no education, and I was married with a 7-month-old son.”
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

John Carlos & Tommie Smith give Black Power salute at 1968 Mexico City Olympics medal ceremony

When the medals were awarded for the men’s 200-meter sprint at the 1968 Olympic Games, Life magazine photographer John Dominis was only about 20 feet away from the podium. “I didn’t think it was a big news event,” Dominis says. “I was expecting a normal ceremony. I hardly noticed what was happening when I was shooting.”

Indeed, the ceremony that October 16 “actually passed without much general notice in the packed Olympic Stadium,” New York Times correspondent Joseph M. Sheehan reported from Mexico City. But by the time Sheehan’s observation appeared in print three days later, the event had become front-page news: for politicizing the Games, U.S. Olympic officials, under pressure from the International Olympic Committee, had suspended medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos and sent them packing.

Smith and Carlos, winners of the gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the event, had come to the ceremony dressed to protest: wearing black socks and no shoes to symbolize African-American poverty, a black glove to express African-American strength and unity. (Smith also wore a scarf, and Carlos beads, in memory of lynching victims.) As the national anthem played and an international TV audience watched, each man bowed his head and raised a fist. After the two were banished, images of their gesture entered the iconography of athletic protest.

"It was a polarizing moment because it was seen as an example of black power radicalism," says Doug Hartmann, a University of Minnesota sociologist and the author of Race, Culture, and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic Protests and Their Aftermath. “Mainstream America hated what they did.”

The United States was already deeply divided over the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement, and the serial traumas of 1968—mounting antiwar protests, the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, the beating of protesters during the Democratic National Convention by Chicago police—put those rifts into high relief. Before the Olympics, many African-American athletes had talked of joining a boycott of the Games to protest racial inequities in the United States. But the boycott, organized by sociologist Harry Edwards, never came off.

As students at San Jose State University, where Edwards was teaching, Smith and Carlos took part in that conversation. Carlos, born and raised in Harlem, was “an extreme extrovert with a challenging personality,” says Edwards, now emeritus professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. Smith, the son of sharecroppers who grew up in rural Texas and California, was “a much softer, private person.” When they raised their fists on the medals stand, they were acting on their own.

Among the Games athletes, opinions were divided. Australia’s Peter Norman, the winner of the silver medal in the 200-meter sprint, mounted the podium wearing a badge supporting Edwards’ organization. Heavyweight boxer George Foreman—who would win a gold medal and wave an American flag in the ring—dismissed the protest, saying, “That’s for college kids.” The four women runners on the U.S. 400-meter relay team dedicated their victory to the exiled sprinters. A representative of the USSR was quoted as saying, perhaps inevitably, “The Soviet Union never has used the Olympic Games for propaganda purposes.”

Smith and Carlos returned home to a wave of opprobrium—they were “black-skinned storm troopers,” in the words of Brent Musburger, who would gain fame as a TV sportscaster but was then a columnist for the Chicago American newspaper—and anonymous death threats. The pressure, Carlos says, was a factor in his then-wife’s suicide in 1977. “One minute everything was sunny and happy, the next minute was chaos and crazy,” he says. Smith recalls, “I had no job and no education, and I was married with a 7-month-old son.”

Full article

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radical individualism serves as the ideological justification of the unconstrained power of what the large majority of individuals experience as a vast anonymous power, which, without any democratic public control, regulates their lives.
Slavoj Zizek (via alterities)

78,845 notes

73r:

rrosequartz:

destructive-creature:

"At Rio Americano High School in Sacramento CA, a student named Dejza, was violently assaulted by a vice principal, Matt Collier, for attempting to take back a piece of art with a political message that the administration didn’t like. She was put in a chokehold and slammed against the desk. When she tried to resist this unlawful abuse of authority, she was slammed and held onto the ground. Matt Collier laid on top of her, crushing her with his weight. Dejza could not breathe, and begged Collier to get off of her. Luckily, another faculty member came in and ended the situation. Dejza went to see a doctor for severe whiplash, and yesterday was her first day of physical therapy. Despite this being blatantly wrong and illegal, the administration has put her on suspension for resisting, and Collier was not disciplined. On the fifth day of her suspension, she will attend a meeting held by bias members of the administration to determine if she will be expelled.

They have tried to silence anyone who speaks out on social media, but today we have gathered in person for a silent sit-in protest.

Dejza has been wronged, and brutalized, and now she is receiving punishment. They’ve tried to silence her. They’ve tried to silence us.” -Grant Wright 

One of my friends Grant posted this on facebook and even though im not in Sacramento I want to help. This girl has been mistreated by a full grown man who may never be punished. I want to help spread awareness. So please, spread this around. Let people know that this is NOT okay. The more support we have, the better. 

i’m so proud to have been a part of this today but you guys please please please please reblog/spread this around any way you possibly can it’s so important and her story needs to be heard by people outside of our city because what this man did is so so so incredibly far from okay

arrest Matt Collier. protect and redeem Dejza.

(via saint-bmo)

524 notes

friendlycloud:

Thousands of people protested in Tokyo against a bill that would see whistleblowing civil servants jailed for up to 10 years. Activists claim the law would help the government to cover up scandals, and damage the country’s constitution and democracy.

A 3,000-seat outdoor theater in a park in downtown Tokyo, near the parliament, was not enough to contain everyone who came on Thursday to denounce government plans to considerably broaden the definition of classified information. 

According to organizers’ estimates, about 10,000 people crowded shoulder-to-shoulder in the isles of the theater and outside of it, holding banners that read: “Don’t take away our freedom.”

Countries ABC, protest: Japan

(Source: thefreelioness)

84 notes

friendlycloud:

fyeaheasterneurope:

Threatening a general strike, throwing smoke grenades and blowing whistles, around 100,000 Polish union members marched through Warsaw on Saturday to vent their anger against the government’s labor and wage policies.

Prime Minister Donald Tusk’s government is rapidly losing support after recently raising the retirement age, announcing a reform of the pension system and relaxing some labor code provisions that allow for longer daily and weekly working hours.

City authorities have blocked traffic in central Warsaw to allow the demonstrators to march to the historic Castle Square with flags and balloons in national white-and-red colors, and banners saying “We are Coming to Get You”, “Tusk’s government Must Go,” and individual plaques reading: “I am Tusk’s Slave.”

…The unionists said that the policies of Tusk’s pro-market government hurt the interests of workers and of their families. Tusk, in his second term and sixth year in office, is Poland’s longest-serving premier since the fall of communism in 1989.

A protester, Andrzej Kulig, said the government never listens to workers’ needs.

“Our situation is getting worse and worse, and our government doesn’t listen to us,” Kulig told AP Television News. “We want them to hear us today, to hear our protest and to know that they don’t govern very well.”

(Source; photo source x, y.)

Countries ABC, protest: Poland

427 notes

anarcho-queer:

Lawmakers in St Louis, Missouri raised serious concerns about escalating tensions between police and African American residents at least a year before the shooting death of Michael Brown in the small suburb of Ferguson.

Tensions have been high because of what the citizens here see as police abuse.” says Michael Voss, the co-founder of Arch City Defenders, a non-profit legal service in St Louis. “I know that our clients feel racially profiled and that their poverty is exploited.

The Arch City Defenders published a white paper last year detailing issues with racial profiling there. The paper argues it’s a systemic problem.

One of the most obvious data points highlighting the disparity is the amount of traffic stops police make on black people.

Let’s take a look at Ferguson. There are more warrants issued in Ferguson than there are people. Voss says a good majority of these warrants are a result of traffic stops.  Black people make up two-thirds of the total driving population, but account for 86 percent of all traffic stops there.

Source

228 notes

St. Louis police officer under investigation following call to protester's employer

jakke:

Internal Affairs is investigating a police officer who called a woman’s employer to discuss her involvement in Ferguson protests.

Leigh Maibes recorded a phone conversation with Officer Keith Novara on a YouTube video in which she questions why he called her boss regarding her involvement and Twitter posts about police tactics used during protests.

In the video, she says Novara called and texted her boss, a real estate broker, on Tuesday, about her tweets.

Oh good apparently protesters can expect their bosses to receive phone calls and texts harassing them about employing someone involved in the protests. Because nothing says “serving and protecting the community” like trying to get someone fired via nagging unsolicited text messages. Anyway, this looks like investigation is being handled by the police department itself, so don’t hold your breath expecting any kind of disciplinary followup.

117 notes

postracialcomments:

@stackizshort

Police are intimidating protestors. They have called her boss stating that she is inciting violence

She has been one of the live streamers who have been documenting the Ferguson and St Louis protests

I thought police intimidation was illegal